octubre 03, 2009

Being a Vet

Being a veterinary surgeon (6th August, day of the Argentine Vet)

Being a vet is not just about taking care of animals. It is, above all, about loving them and not merely conforming with the ethical guidelines of a medical science.


Being a vet is knowing the immortality of nature and wanting to preserve it ever more beautiful.


Being a vet is to hear miewing, lowing, bleeting, neighing, trilling, crowing and clucking and barking and, mainly, to interpret their meaning and understand them. It is to enjoy moist soil, the countryside, woods, scrubland and open spaces, moons and rain.


Being a vet is not to care whether animals think or not, but to care whether they suffer. It is to dedicate a part of your being to the art of saving lives.


Being a vet is to approach your instincts; to lose your fears. It is to gain friends of fur and feather who will never let you down.


Being a vet is to detest confinement and cages. It is to invest huge amounts of time appreciating flocks, herds and bird flight; to continuously discover oneself through animals.


Being a vet is having the capacity to interpret tail wagging, loving scratches and affectionate bites.

Being a vet is being able to understand sad yes, drooping ears, hot noses, unrest or unnatural naps.


Being a vet is being able to read the body language of animals and understand mute pleas for help. It is to interpret gestures and attitudes of pain, and to know how to aleviate it. It is to smell wet fur and pillows that smell of cat, of sheep, of farmyard, of manure.


Being a vet is to have the courage to penetrate into a different world and yet remain unchanged. It is having the capacity to recognise that mute gratitude is undoubtedly the only true gratitude. It is to smell the breath of a puppy and recall one´s own childhood.


Being a vet is to coexist alongside profound lessons of love and life.


Being a vet is to share, daily, in the miracle of life. It is to coexist with death, to know that it is definite, but not always unpleasant. We can all study veterinary science, but we will not all become vets.


Translated, adapted and modified from a publication of the Federal College of Veterinary Surgeons of Brasil, 1996, by Manuel Godoy (Mendoza - Argentina).


http://veterinaria-animales-mendoza.blogspot.com